Gender and The Heterogeneity of Human Experience (With Slam Poetry)

Created using Purple Sherbet Photography/Flickr. Click photo for original.
Created using Purple Sherbet Photography/Flickr. Click photo for original.

I’m bringing my blog back to life and kicking the tires a bit. No more preamble, let’s get to it:

I don’t line up perfectly with our society’s definition of “man” (understatement) — and it has caused me a great deal of turmoil throughout my life. Even now I contemplate changing my gender label on Facebook as a statement of rebellion against the toxic and repressive way our society defines maleness AND as a way of better reflecting who I really am.

To make a superhero analogy that might require you to look up some names: I’d be as excited, if not more so, to wake up one morning as Carol Danvers or Jennifer Walters as I would Peter Parker or Kurt Wagner.

So, in solidarity with bisexual visibility day, and as a complement on the gender-identity side of the gender/sexuality divide, I post this. And I share this guy’s moving and dead-on response to the tyranny of “man up” — tyranny not just against women but against everyone who doesn’t fit an absurdly narrow conception that mutes the incredible heterogeneity of human experience.

Now watch this. Listen. And imagine a life taking all that anger and frustration and turning it inward.

 

A final request: please, spread this around. Just being visible as ourselves and not the simplified constructs of our cultures is possibly the best way we can change that culture. And it would mean more to me than you know.

Oh, and you know what, I did change that label.

Sincerely and genderqueerly,
– Kenrick

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4 thoughts on “Gender and The Heterogeneity of Human Experience (With Slam Poetry)

      1. You’re extremely welcome. Thanks for being so bold as to take my very well-thought out advice and use the up-and-coming technology of the ‘weblog’ as a way to come out. 😉 ❤

      2. Wait, this was your advice? I honestly didn’t even remember … I think we talked about gender, though? (A lot of my memories of deep, late-night conversations are a bit hazy.)

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